The Greylock Echo

As Winter Begins, Students Talk Snow Days and Alternative Solutions

Back to Article
Back to Article

As Winter Begins, Students Talk Snow Days and Alternative Solutions


Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






As the winter season rolls around, and snow starts to build up in Berkshire County, schools in the area are prone to dangerous weather conditions. As ice and snow gather on roads, busing officials and school administrators work together to determine if schools should start on time, delay, or cancel. These particular days not only affect teachers, administration, staff,  but regionalized students. This month the Echo interviewed students to discuss how snow days affect their lives.

Isabel Beauchamp, a tenth grader, expressed excitement when discussing snow days. She responded with an optimistic outlook on the situation by saying, “snow days and delay are great because students can have a day off. Students can do activities, work on chores, meet up with friends, and just take a break from a rigorous day at school.” According to Beuchamp, “it’s helpful because I can catch up on homework, do chores or just relax.” Freshman Ava Simon shared similar thoughts on the issue.  Simon claimed that snow days are important for leisurely activities, noting the momentary relief from the “omnipotent presence of school.” However, Simon also pointed out some of the negative implications of snow days, worrying about administrators having to reassign days later in June. Simon told the Echo that she finds school in the summer kind of a chore. She notes that makeup days mean fewer trips, less time for leisure, and definitely not enough time “to be alone watching Anime.” Simon’s rationale is reasonable, as snow days must by law be made up during the academic calendar year.

Sophomore Sol Sutter has an evenhanded argument on snow day cancellations. Sutter sees a potential snow day as a chance for a free workday, and a chance to sleep in a little later.  Sol pointed out that when driving to Williamstown from Windsor, hazardous conditions can make the commute much more difficult.

A fellow peer, Priya D’Souza, pointed out the safety for students on snow days is a serious consideration, “I feel that if the school calls a snow day,  you could possibly save lives on the road. The potential build-up of snow and ice can make the roads slippery — leading to possible accidents that could severely injure or kill drivers. It’s just safer, in general, to keep in touch with people working on the roads. If there is a problem we should cancel school for safety.”

One topic that has been circling around the community is the notion of having “blizzard bags.” Blizzard Bags represent the idea that teachers can give digital work to students on snow days, which allows students to do work at home and not make up days in June. Eliza Goldsteen, an eighth grader, loathed the idea of blizzard bags. Said Goldsteen, “personally I really would not like blizzard bags because I like to enjoy my snow days as much as I can. Having snow days is essential to being young. Taking that away is taking away an important experience to a young person. Also, I am not disciplined enough to do the work given to me and…  I really don’t mind how far we go because we start so late in September.”

While several students agreed with Goldsteen’s anti-work-on-snow-days sentiment, Beuchamp expressed a different opinion, saying, “I like the idea of blizzard bags because I can get all my work done and out of the way.” Beuchamp also found the idea of “possibly getting a longer summer vacation” attractive. A final decision has not been made about blizzard bags by the administration or school committee. But, as principal MacDonald pointed out, “It is not likely that Mount Greylock would have blizzard bags without significant conversation with faculty from all grades and disciplines.” According to MacDonald, she and curriculum leaders will be discussing blizzard bags on Tuesday, December 18.

Students and community members seeking further clarification to Massachusetts’ policy on school day structuring and exemptions should visit http://www.doe.mass.edu/news/news.aspx?id=6682 and review (603 CMR 27.06) to better understand the rules and regulations surrounding snow days.

Leave a Comment

The Echo welcomes all discussion regarding the stories we published. Please contribute to the conversation by leaving your thoughts below!

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • As Winter Begins, Students Talk Snow Days and Alternative Solutions

    Features

    An Interview with Nicole Overbaugh

  • As Winter Begins, Students Talk Snow Days and Alternative Solutions

    Features

    An Interview with Nima Darafshi

  • As Winter Begins, Students Talk Snow Days and Alternative Solutions

    Features

    Seventh Graders Embrace Art, Positive Messages Through Curating a Culture of Respect Program

  • As Winter Begins, Students Talk Snow Days and Alternative Solutions

    Features

    Students React to Admissions Scandal

  • Features

    Eagle Scout: An Interview with Mike Maruk

  • As Winter Begins, Students Talk Snow Days and Alternative Solutions

    Features

    GMSU to Return

  • As Winter Begins, Students Talk Snow Days and Alternative Solutions

    Features

    Katherine Wilson Wins VFW Voice of Democracy Contest

  • As Winter Begins, Students Talk Snow Days and Alternative Solutions

    Features

    Freshman’s Webcomic Interest Leaves Mark on Directed Study Classroom

  • As Winter Begins, Students Talk Snow Days and Alternative Solutions

    Features

    Community, Bonding, and School Spirit

  • As Winter Begins, Students Talk Snow Days and Alternative Solutions

    Features

    1968

Navigate Right
The Student News Site of Mount Greylock Regional High School
As Winter Begins, Students Talk Snow Days and Alternative Solutions