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The Fight for the Deal

Neal remains the last Massachusetts congressman not to support it. Some students aren't happy.

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The Fight for the Deal

Greylock students hold signs outside of Richard Neal's Pittsfield office.

Greylock students hold signs outside of Richard Neal's Pittsfield office.

Photo courtesy of Owen Tucker-Smith

Greylock students hold signs outside of Richard Neal's Pittsfield office.

Photo courtesy of Owen Tucker-Smith

Photo courtesy of Owen Tucker-Smith

Greylock students hold signs outside of Richard Neal's Pittsfield office.

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Over the past weeks, students in grades seven through twelve have collaborated with the Sunrise Movement and local schools to fight for a new congressional resolution: the Green New Deal. After attending a group watch-party for the Sunrise Movement’s informational livestream, students proceeded to visit congressman Richard Neal’s office in Pittsfield to demand his support. After weeks of silence from the congressman, the students visited his Springfield office on Tuesday as part of the Green New Deal Nationwide Day of Action.

The Green New Deal, Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s and Senator Ed Markey’s plan to stop climate change and create millions of jobs in the process, was released as a resolution in the first week of February. The resolution differed from many pieces of proposed climate legislation in that it combined the fight for climate justice with that for social and economic justice. In addition to net-zero carbon emissions, the resolution called for things such as “resources, training, and high-quality education, including higher education, [for] all people of the United States, with a focus on frontline and vulnerable communities” and the promotion of  “justice and equity by stopping current, preventing future, and repairing historic oppression” of the “frontline and vulnerable communities” referenced throughout the resolution.

Soon after the launch of the Green New Deal as a resolution, every congressperson from Massachusetts became a co-sponsor with the exception of Richard Neal, a representative from Western Massachusetts. Students responded to Neal’s silence by making signs and arriving at his office. A representative for Neal met with three Greylock students inside, while the rest of the students waited outside, waving signs and singing songs.

The students at Neal’s office explained that they were led to push for the Green New Deal because of the urgency of climate change. “If we don’t do this today, then it’s too late,” said senior James Fisher. Senior Sophie Jones echoed this sentiment, arguing that “if we don’t do something now, then my future children and their children’s children won’t have a safe planet to live in. And they need that.”

Seniors Cathy McPartland and Karen McComish and junior Maddy Art represented the students inside the office, voicing their concerns to a member of Neal’s staff. “We shared a couple of personal stories and explained why the Green New Deal would be important and effective in our district specifically,” said McComish.

The Berkshires, as McPartland explained, have been hit by deindustrialization over the last decades. She believes that this gives Western Mass a special reason to support the Green New Deal.

“I talked about the effect of General Electric and Sprague leaving our community,” McPartland told the Echo. “The Green New Deal is so important because it has language for transitioning jobs, so it would not just be good environmentally, but especially here for economic reasons.”

The Green New Deal is so important because it has language for transitioning jobs, so it would not just be good environmentally, but especially here for economic reasons.”

— Cathy McPartland

Criticism of the Green New Deal has emerged partially because of the deal’s broad, vague nature. McPartland and McComish argued that this aspect of it is actually purposeful and important. They both stressed that “a national sweeping policy that addresses many facets of environmental issues” was necessary to tackle such a large and urgent issue. “We don’t have enough time for each individual thing to get individually passed,” McPartland said.

Students at the office visit were quick to provide personal anecdotes to express their desire for environmental action. For McComish, this included a story about her family, who saw the dangers of ignoring the environment directly.

“A couple of years ago my cousins in Hoosick Falls, their water was poisoned by PFOA. Within a year Judy, Everett, and their dog all had cancer and they’re still struggling with it today,” said McComish. “That had a big impact on my own family and it really awakened me to the urgency and how immediate environmental dangers are.”

Art’s experience came in the form of having a grandfather who has always known nature well. An ecologist, his love of nature has been transferred to Art herself.

The results of the meeting were not a satisfying immediate co-sponsorship, but the students inside said that they got out of it what they wanted to. “The point of this meeting was to get our stories told and to tell Neal that his constituents do care so that he has reason to support the Green New Deal,” McComish said. “We were able to tell our stories and he is planning on passing those up the ladder. Hopefully that will mean something,” McPartland added.

The students’ visit, which was covered on iBerkshires and through the Sunrise Facebook page, received an abundance of negative reception. Many iBerkshires Facebook commenters, calling the students “ignorant,” “arrogant,” “indoctrinated,” and “uninformed,” expressed strong distate for the Green New Deal and the students supporting it.

Responding to these comments, McComish told the Echo that “when they go low, we go high,” quoting Michelle Obama. “A few [Greylock] people did respond in the comments, but they were only comments that were positive and based on facts, which was the opposite of what the other comments were.”

In her commented response, Art noted that the importance of the Deal lay much in its ability to create discussion about important issues.

“We are hopeful that this can be taken as an opportunity to have a conversation about how to best combat climate change,” Art wrote. “If you don’t support the Green New Deal, what kinds of environmental legislation would you like to see? How should we all work to make that happen?”     McComish said that the resolution probably will not get passed, and that attention for climate issues is a valuable reward for the Green New Deal’s efforts.

“[The Green New Deal] has shown politicians that this is a priority, that this is what we care about. Showing support for this will make it more likely in the future that politicians will support good environmental legislation,” said McComish.

In the weeks following the Pittsfield visit, Neal did not announce his support, so students joined the Nationwide Day of Action by protesting at Neal’s Springfield office. Neal announced recently that he is committed to passing legislation that will lower emissions, but the protesters said that that wasn’t enough – that “incremental changes” would not be satisfactory.

“We came here today to ask Representative Neal to support this deal because it is the only progressive deal that will have the change that we need to take right now,” said senior Ella Dudley in a speech outside of Neal’s Springfield office. “If we don’t enact change now, our future and our environment and the beautiful nature of this state and this country will be destroyed forever.”

If we don’t enact change now, our future and our environment… will be destroyed forever.”

— Ella Dudley

In her speech, McComish told the crowd about her family’s experience with poisoned water at the hands of a factory, and said that “the intersection between corporate greed and political complacency resulting in entirely preventable human-made dangers has haunted me and my country.”

“I read about flint, where the politicians in power were responsible for poisoning an entire city,” said McComish. “And today I read about senators on the other coast who dismiss their youth constituents, reasoning that their record of incremental policies which they have enacted during decades in office is enough and sufficient for now.”

McComish pointed out in her speech that Neal was in an important position: “Neal, you have the power to make a statement by co-sponsoring the Green New Deal. Right now you have the power, being the last person in Massachusetts, to make our state the first one to have full support of the resolution.”

Also present at the Springfield rally were members of Sunrise Boston, who emphasized that “all we want is a good job and a livable future. We don’t think that’s too much to ask… We know [Neal’s] been an environmental champion in the past, and we are so hopeful that he will co-sponsor this resolution.

About the Writer
Owen Tucker-Smith, Editor-in-Chief

Owen has been on Echo staff for three years. When not writing, editing, and publishing stories, he can be found doing nerdy things (playing the piano,...

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